Fall 2022

IT75 Berkeley Art Museum
Mario Telo
MWF
1:00-2:00

Study of the major developments, achievements, and contradictions in Greek culture from the Bronze Age to the 4th century BCE. Key works of literature, history, and philosophy (read in English translation) will be examined in their political and social context, and in relation both to other ancient Mediterranean cultures and to subsequent developments in Western civilization.


219 Dwinelle
J. Theodore Pena
TuTh
9:30-11:00

Broad-based introduction to the archaeology of the ancient Romans.


106 Stanley
Trevor M. Murphy and G.R.F. (John) Ferrari
MW
12:00-2:00

Covering Homeric & Classical Greece, Rome in its transition from republic to empire, & the world of the Hebrew Bible, this course surveys ancient Mediterranean civilizations with an emphasis on building writing skill. Satisfies Parts A or B of the R&C requirement.


259 Dwinelle
Todd M. Hickey
TuTh
2:00-3:00

Learn how to interpret papyri from Graeco-Roman Egypt and to deploy them for the writing of more inclusive histories of the ancient Mediterranean.


179 Dwinelle
Trevor M. Murphy
MWF
3:00-4:00

This course will focus on ideas about magic in the Greek and Roman worlds from about 750 BCE through 400 CE. Topics will include witches, holy men, love spells, necromancy, spirits, and mystery religions.We will examine how magic was represented in high literature (by authors like Homer, Ovid, Apuleius and Lucian) as well as the more practical evidence of curse tablets and the Greek Magical Papyri. Consideration will be given to analyzing the relationship between magic, religion, and philosophy. Our goal will be to study the common threads that connect different Greek and Roman magical practices, as well as to understand them in their cultural contexts. No knowledge of Greek or Latin required.


425 Doe Library
Chris Hallett
M
9:00-12:00

During the reign of Augustus Rome was transformed by an ambitious building program. This class will consider how the emperor’s many buildings—his Mausoleum, the new temples, his many monuments—helped shape popular perceptions of his new system of government (a veiled monarchy).


124 Wheeler
J. Theodore Pena
TuTh
12:30-2:00

A broad survey of the remains of the ancient towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum, considering we can employ this evidence to illuminate the social, political, and economic life of these two communities.

24 Wheeler
TBA
MWF
10:00-11:00

The first semester of study of Ancient Greek


105 Dwinelle
TBA
MWF
1:00-2:00

The first semester of study of Ancient Greek


308C Doe Library
G.R.F (John) Ferrari
MWF
10:00-11:00

In this course we will read two texts in the original Ancient Greek (NOT in translation!): first, Lysias' courtroom speech “On the murder of Eratosthenes,” followed by Plato's "Crito." 


308C Doe Library
TBA
TuTh
9:30-11:00

Reading in the original ancient Greek of a tragedy by Euripides plus study of other Greek tragedies translated into English.


308C Doe Library
Mark Griffith
MW
12:30-2:00

Selections from Hesiod's Theogony and Works and Days (read in Greek), along with some short specimens of other Greek and Near Eastern wisdom and didactic texts (read in English).

2070 VLSB
TBA
MTuWTh
10:00-11:00

The first half of a two-semester language sequence equipping students to read and translate Classical Latin.


102 Latimer
TBA
MTuWTh
11:00-12:00

The first half of a two-semester language sequence equipping students to read and translate Classical Latin.


255 Dwinelle
TBA
MTuWTh
2:00-3:00

The first half of a two-semester language sequence equipping students to read and translate Classical Latin.


6 Evans
TBA
MWF
11:00-12:00

The second half of a two-semester language sequence preparing students to read Classical Latin.


54 Social Sciences Building
TBA
MWF
9:00-10:00

Selected readings in Caesar, Sallust, and Cicero; some review of grammar.


TBA
Ellen Oliensis
TuTh
3:30 - 5:00

An introduction to the short poems of Catullus and the Odes of Horace, read in Latin.


308C Doe Library
Trevor M. Murphy
TuTh
12:30-2:00

Investigate the world of ancient natural philosophers in Latin scientific texts of the 1st century CE. We'll read excerpts (in Latin) from Seneca & Pliny the Elder, especially meteorology, geology, & anthropology, with excursions into astronomy & medicine.

308C Doe Library
Dylan Sailor
MW
11:00-12:30

Part one of a two-part survey of literature in Latin from Roman antiquity.


308C Doe Library
Kathleen McCarthy
Th
2:00-5:00

308C Doe Library
Greg Woolf
W
2:00-5:00

This seminar will focus on human experiences of and uses of the forest in the Mediterranean world of the classical period.


308C Doe Library
Kathleen McCarthy
F
11:00-1:00

A workshop-style class for grad students beginning to teach at UCB. Will cover both language classes and classes where everything is read in translation.